Month: March 2020

Run A Successful Small Business

  • Get in motion by eliminating the procrastinator’s best friend: “Messy Desk/Office Syndrome.” If that is something you’re plagued with, you’ll find slaying the beast a lot easier if you take what I call the “The 3 D System” approach to organization which directs that you look at what is on your desk or what is cluttering your office and either Dump it, Deal with it or Delegate it.
  • Outsource everything that is not the best use of your time. Look at where you make your money, and if it’s not at bookkeeping, Web site maintenance, or writing marketing materials, for example, farm those tasks out to someone who can do them far more quickly and efficiently than you can.
  • Take things from your “to-do” list and block off actual times for working on specific items. For example, 10-10:30 AM might be for returning phone calls; 1-2:00 PM for working on an article; 2-3:00 PM could be for updating your marketing plan or for researching business networking events. You’ll be amazed at how much more you get done when you assign specific times for doing things.
  • Resist the temptation to answer the phone every time it rings as a new conversation will not only distract you from what you are doing, but it may lead you to abandon the task all together as you become drawn into resolving other matters. If you work alone, pretend you have a secretary and that you’ve told him or her to “hold all calls.” Then return the calls when you have both a clear mind and the time to tackle them.
  • Take charge of your e-mails; don’t let them take charge of you. Resist temptation and commit to checking your in-box only twice a day: first thing in the morning and around 3:00 PM.
  • Set specific, realistic goals with timelines and commit to taking at least two action steps every day.
  • Avoid becoming overwhelmed by chunking every task down into manageable bite-sized pieces. Not only will you get more done, you will feel terrific as you realize how much you have accomplished.

Stages Of Business Development

Start-up Phase

Start-up phase is that phase during which a business comes into existence. It is during this phase that plans are conceptualized and implemented regarding how the business should be set up, how it should be run, where to get the start up capital from and how to keep the cash flow going. During the start up phase, legalities of setting up the business are taken care of. Every business, which is starting up will normally require a large investment of capital, lots of time and effort, setting up of good profitable and stable customer base, money to buy raw materials, manpower recruitment etc. Businesses usually arrange for their own limited resources to run their activities. At first, demand is assessed and/or created for the products or services the business wishes to offer. Then manufacturing facility and processes are established (if it is a business engaged in manufacturing) or processes for providing service are established (if the business will be service provider) or goods for sale are purchased (if it will be business engaged in trade).

Growth Phase

During this phase of its existence, businesses experience expansion of its activities and enhancement of its customer base. It is an exciting period for the business. Its products and services are gaining acceptance in the marketplace and customers are patronizing them in increasing numbers. Profit margins also tend to increase during this phase. During this phase, the business require infusion of additional capital to buy capital equipment to increase production (for manufacturing businesses), to establish additional service network (for service providers) or procure more goods for trade (for trading businesses).

Maturity Phase

This is the third stage of a business development. During this phase cash flows stabilize and establishment of marketing networks and operational channels are completed. The respective brands become well known and there is a stable and faithful customer following. This is an ideal time for businesses to consider expansion or diversification.

Decline Phase

This is the last phase of any business. It is also called the terminal phase. During this phase, the business experiences market pressures from all quarters, and are unable to handle them successfully. The inevitable is cash flow drying up and losses mount up. Most businesses fold up during this phase. There are resilient businesses that do survive this phase and go on to succeed on a new lease of life.

Business Support Software

There are many support processes that any business would need during its existence. To support these business processes, softwares are hitting the market that cater to both new and experienced entrepreneurs. These softwares help business owners and managers to manage the business operations well. They are worth the money spent on them.